Maps, Ships and Architecture

Maritime Ephemera

TWO ANTIQUE ALCOHOL LIT
BINACCLES WITH COMPASSES

BINACCLES WITH COMPASSES

BINACCLES WITH COMPASSES

 ∞

ANTIQUE COPPER & BRASS DIVING HELMET
BY C. E. HEINKE & CO. (Patent 43)

C. E. HEINKE & CO Diving Helmet

C. E. HEINKE & CO Diving Helmet

SHIP COMPASS IN GIMBALS
WITH FLOATING ALUMINUM
10” COMPASS CARD

By Lord Kelvin signed circa 1895
made by Kelvin & Hughes Ltd. Great Britain

Kelvin & Hughes Ltd. Ship Compass

Kelvin & Hughes Ltd. Ship Compass

“SOUTHWIND”
CHANDELIER BINNACLE

 This chandelier binnacle was salvaged from the famous two-masted schooner “Southwind” when she sank in a freak “Nor’easter” (storm blowing from the northeast) in Galveston, Texas.

SOUTHWIND CHANDELIER BINNACLE

SOUTHWIND CHANDELIER BINNACLE

 

From South Wind:
The Yachting News Magazine
May 1983

The Southwind, one of the last great two-masted schooners to grace the seven seas with her cloud of sail.  Commissioned in 1929 at Boothbay, Maine by Houston’s Benjamin Clayton, the Southwind sailed into one of America’s most romantic eras.

Her skippers read like a who’s who in Hollywood.  Included in her past masters are such greats as Charles “Huck” Jones, Joseph Maniewicz, George Brent, Jack Warner, and Jackie Coogan.  While Warner owned her, the flamboyant Errol Flynn escaped upon her decks.  Murry Samuals, who was her master during the early fifties drank many a rum and coke with Ernest Hemingway anchored in HavanaHarbor.

Southwind, Schooner

Southwind, Schooner

Originally designed by John Alden of Boston, the Southwind was commissioned Sartartia by Benjamin Clayton.  Sartartia was the name of one of the Clayton’s family plantations.  Two weeks after she was launched, Clayton and his new bride took their honeymoon cruise aboard her to the Bahamas.  Clayton sailed her two years and on February 7, 1931, the Sartartia was sold to Harry J. Bauer of Los Angeles who renamed her the Southwind, thus beginning her career as “Yacht of the Stars.”

In 1962, D.F.W. Downey, a multi-millionaire Houston builder. Bought her for the price of $400,000.00.  Downey refitted her in Boston and added the small deck cabin.  She originally was a flush-decked schooner.  Downey made her ready for chartering business in the windward and Leeward Islands, sailing the waters of the Carribean.

In September of 1971, “Doc” Rail of Nassau Bay, Texas, purchased the Southwind.  She was berthed at MorgansPoint for a number of years after Downey’s death and was badly in need of repair.

Rail was refitting her in Galveston at the GalvestonYachtBasin, when a freak storm blew out of the Northeast on November 23 with winds up to 30 knots.  The Southwind beat herself to death and sank in 35’ of water.  She had taken a 4’ x 4’ hole in her starboard side at the beam.  But damage was more extensive than that; her keel had also pulled away from the bottom.  The Southwind seemed destined for the salvage heap…The Southwind, “Yacht of the Stars.”

In an attempt to make South Wind Magazine as fascinating as her namesake, the staff at South Wind wishes to dedicate this publication to the stars, the moon, and the waves, which together along with the other forces of nature, combine to create the world of yachting.

PIECE OF THE ENGLISH MAN-OF-WAR “ROYAL GEORGE”

A piece of the English Man-of-War “Royal George” sank at Spithead, August 27, 1782. Presented by the Milard Hampshire County, England. May 20th, 1849 by Wm. F. Carrington; Measures 6.5″ Wide at Widest Capital; 5.5″ Wide at Narrowest Shaft; Radius 3.25″ from Shaft Core to Widest Capital

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